Saturday, August 16, 2014

Jelani Cobb Gives Updates on Ferguson on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

The eyes of the world have been on a small suburb of St. Louis for the last week. Since Saturday, August 9, 2014 millions have been watching their televisions and monitoring social media for updates on details regarding the shooting of an unarmed Ferguson, Missouri teenager Michael Brown that has led to escalating racial tensions, protesters being tear gassed, mounting military like presence of the local police, a string of press conferences that were head scratchers and the revelation that Michael Brown may have been involved in a robbery only minutes before being shot multiple times by officer Darren Wilson.


On Saturday, August 16, 2014, Professor William Jelani Cobb will join us to share what he has seen firsthand in #Ferguson. Professor Cobb, an Associate Professor of History and Director, Institute for African American Studies at Rutgers, has written several posts for The New Yorker about actual events in Ferguson, Missouri.


With stories changing quickly, it is important to not only hear from trusted individuals with no agendas but to help break down events day by day. Many are asking what happened out of camera views that made the atmosphere so charged throughout the week and how did the protests go from peaceful assembly on Friday (Aug 15) to looting in the early morning hours on Saturday? How did Captain Ron Johnson win the trust of the people of Ferguson so quickly and other questions will be answered.

Text your questions for Professor Cobb to INSPIRE to 99000.

 Living Your Best Life Radio, radio that empowers, inspires, and motivates you to live your BEST life, can be heard on 760 AM in the Middle-Tennessee Region, Tune In, military bases, and streamed live on U-Stream.TV from 9-10AM CST. This show will also air on WTST, a member of the HBCU radio network (XM 142).

More About Professor Jelani Cobb


Jelani Cobb has been a contributor to The New Yorker and newyorker.com since 2013, writing frequently about race, politics, history, and culture. His most recent book is “The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress.” He’s an associate professor of history and the director of Africana studies at the University of Connecticut.

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