Saturday, March 30, 2013

HBCUstory on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes as we profile organizations and leaders who lead by example. With extraordinary acts of kindness and charitable giving that help countless lives daily, these organizations and leaders embody "Be the change you want to see in the world".

Throughout 2013 listeners will hear from presidents of organizations who are global change agents. We will also hear from CEOs of social enterprise businesses who are changing communities and college educators who are taking their students out of the classroom and into surrounding neighborhoods to learn and serve others.




Join us on Saturday, March 30, 2013, to hear from the founding editor of HBCUstory,  Dr. Crystal deGregory. Listen to Dr. deGregory share her passion for chronicling the history, the struggles, the challenges, and the beauty of the nation's Historically Black Universities and Colleges. deGregory will share the traditional roles of HBCUs as well as the relevancy of HBCUs as they adapt to the changing demographics of our country and financial challenges. deGregory  will discuss the culture of academia, young academics need for mentoring, and why HBCU institutions must get better at telling their story beyond the HBCU community.

Tune in to hear share about the stellar line up of speakers of the Inaugural HBCUstory Symposium and it's keynote speaker, President Sorrell of Paul Quinn College. Listen to how  her share how her dream is now reality with the support of the Nashville Public Library and why the symposium will be a safe environment to exchange ideas and share concerns that will collect “Inspiring Stories of the Past and Present, For Our Future.”

Part 1 will air this weekend.

 Living Your Best Life, a radio show that empowers, inspires and motivates one to live their BEST life, can heard on 760 AM in the Middle-Tennessee Region, military bases, and streamed live on U-Stream.TV from 9-10AM CST. This show will also be aired on WTST, a member of the HBCU radio network.

More About HBCUStory

 Founded in 2012, HBCUstory, Inc. is a nonprofit advocacy initiative,  preserving, presenting and promoting inspiring stories of the Historically Black College and University (HBCU) community’s past and present, for our future.

Each and everyday, the HBCU community is writing the HBCUstory. We have fond memories of administrators, faculty, staff and fellow alumni–of people who believed in us and made us believe in ourselves.

We who believe in the mission and vision of HBCUs must leverage our HBCU stories as more than mere memories. They serve as compelling evidence for the future of these’s educational, cultural and social treasures.

At HBCUstory, we’re making memories matter.

Symposium Announcement

Nashville-Based HBCUSTORY Announces Distinguished HBCU President as Keynote for Inaugural Symposium
Symposium will also feature 15 scholars from across the nation
NASHVILLE, TN – March 18, 2013: Nashville-based HBCUSTORY Inc. announces that Michael J. Sorrell, Esq., president of Paul Quinn College in Dallas, will serve as keynote speaker for the inaugural HBCUSTORY Symposium, scheduled Saturday, April 27, from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Main Nashville Public Library at 615 Church Street.

Presented in partnership with the Nashville Public Library and the Nashville Public Library Foundation, the 2013 HBCUSTORY Symposium, themed “Inspiring Stories of the Past and Present, For Our Future” will also feature fifteen scholars from across the nation. These academicians and practitioners will share original research on emerging topics in the fields of history, information science, fundraising, partnerships, LBGTQ studies, athletics and wellness.

“This historic event provides an opportunity for members of the HBCU community to support positive stories reflecting the great work HBCUs have done and are doing,” said Dr. Crystal A. deGregory, HBCUSTORY Founder and Executive Director. “Our HBCUSTORY Symposium encourages HBCUs to craft their own stories and encourages academicians to consider HBCUs as subjects worthy of serious study. And, perhaps, even more importantly, the Symposium compels HBCU supporters to take an active role in ensuring a bright future for these giants in the pantheon of American educational history.”

Named by HBCU Digest as its “2012 HBCU Male President of the Year,” Sorrell is leading Paul Quinn College into one of the greatest turnarounds in the history of higher education, which includes the college being named by its peers as HBCU Digest’s “2011 HBCU of the Year” and being selected as a finalist for the 2013 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll.

“This type of symposium is long overdue,” Sorrell said. “Kudos to Dr. deGregory for creating a venue for scholarly discourse around a topic about which so many of us are passionate. Paul Quinn College and I will always support efforts that are committed to analyzing, debating, and celebrating both the history and the future of HBCUs.”

To register for the 2013 Symposium, please visit http://www.hbcustorysymposium.eventbrite.com. Registration is required. Limited on-site registration is available.
To learn more about HBCUSTORY, visit us online at http://www.hbcustory.com/

HBCUstory Storytellers

FOUNDER & EXECUTIVE EDITOR/HISTORY & CULTURE EDITOR
Crystal A. deGregory, Ph.D. is a graduate of the historic Fisk University ’03. She received her master’s and doctoral degrees in history from Vanderbilt University and now teaches in Tennessee State University’s department of history, geography and political science. Follow her on twitter at @HBCUstorian or contact her via email at cadegregory@HBCUstory.com.

MANAGING EDITOR/HEALTH & WELLNESS EDITOR
E. Clare Stewart, MSPH is graduate of Fisk University ’05 and Meharry Medical College, School of Graduate Studies and Research. She currently serves as the Community Coordinator for the HBCU Wellness Project at Fisk University. Follow her on twitter at @EClareStewart or contact her via email at ecstewart@HBCUstory.com.

Photo credits: Genma Holmes

Friday, March 22, 2013

Author of Baden-Powell's Beads on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes


Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes as we profile organizations and leaders who lead by example. With extraordinary acts of kindness and charitable giving that help countless lives daily, these organizations and leaders embody "Be the change you want to see in the world".

Throughout 2013, Living Your Best Life will feature various authors of books that empower, inspire, and motivate one to think deeper, learn more, while keeping us intrigued.





On  Saturday, March 23, 2013 tune in to hear from orthopedic surgeon turned author, Paul Parsons.
Paul Parson has written a fascinating fictional titled, Baden-Powell's Beads, a "page-turning novel that entertains the reader from the opening sentence to the final page." The book is based on the true story of the original Zulu beads given by the founder of the Boy Scouts, Lord Baden-Powell to Scoutmasters.

Paul Parsons' Baden-Powell's Beads, the first book in the Beads series, uses historically accurate events and religious history to weave a gripping, fast-paced thriller that keeps readers enthralled until the very end. Paul will also share about book marketing and what it took to launch this series.

Living Your Best Life, a radio show that empowers, inspires and motivates one to live their BEST life, can heard on 760 AM in the Middle-Tennessee Region, military bases, and streamed live on U-Stream.TV from 9-10AM CST. (This show was aired on WTST, a member of the HBCU radio network.)


More About The Author







The oldest of three, born into a career military family, Paul grew up on naval bases throughout the world. At age 10, while in Puerto Rico, he came down with a serious kidney ailment and was confined to bed for one year. It was during this time he discovered he could excel academically. His sophomore and junior years in high school were spent in Madrid and Seville, Spain, away from his parents stationed in Sigonella, Sicily. After graduating in Jacksonville, Florida, he attended Dartmouth College and rowed all four years on the lightweight crew team, traveling to England for the Henley Royal Regatta after his senior year.

Medical school at the University of Tennessee provided another travel opportunity as Paul was the first exchange medical student from UT to Egypt, where he studied infectious diseases for two months. As a practicing orthopedic surgeon, he’s traveled to Russia, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary as part of a performing arts medicine delegation. Other recreational travels include trips to Hawaii, Tahiti, Scotland, various sites around Europe, and a week on the Amazon River.

A voracious reader, Paul made it a goal to study prolific late twentieth century American novelists by collecting and reading their works in chronological order. Those whose books he’s completed include Jean Auel, Tom Clancy, Nelson DeMille, Vince Flynn, Diana Gabaldon, Terry Goodkind, John Grishsam, Gary Jennings, Steven King, James Michener, Robert Ludlum, and Wilbur Smith (admittedly not American, though one of the best).  He’s halfway through Greg Iles, Larry McMurtry, and Easton Press’ 100 Greatest Books. Other interests include golf and guitar picking (a requirement if living near Nashville).

Baden-Powell’s Beads is the first of his six novels to be published, with a release date of April10, 2012.

Paul lives with his wife and two dogs in Brentwood, Tennessee and has a second home in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Paul D. Parsons Website

More About Lord Baden-Powell 


Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell, (February 22, 1857 – January 8, 1941), also known or Lord Baden-Powell, was a lieutenant-general in the British Army, writer, founder of the Scout Movement and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association.

After having been educated at Charterhouse School, Baden-Powell served in the British Army from 1876 until 1910 in India and Africa. In 1899, during the Second Boer War in South Africa, Baden-Powell successfully defended the town in the Siege of Mafeking. Several of his military books, written for military reconnaissance and scout training in his African years, were also read by boys. Based on those earlier books, he wrote Scouting for Boys, published in 1908 by Sir Arthur Pearson, for youth readership. In 1907, he held the first Brownsea Island Scout camp, which is now seen as the beginning of Scouting.

After his marriage to Olave St Clair Soames, Baden-Powell, his sister Agnes Baden-Powell and notably his wife actively gave guidance to the Scouting Movement and the Girl Guides Movement. Baden-Powell lived his last years in Nyeri, Kenya, where he died and was buried in 1941.

Photo credit: Pictures of Paula D. Parsons at book signing by Genma Holmes


Saturday, March 16, 2013

American Baptist College on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

 Update: Audio of the show here

Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes as we profile organizations and leaders who lead by example. With extraordinary acts of kindness and charitable giving that help countless lives daily, these organizations and leaders embody "Be the change you want to see in the world".

Throughout 2013 listeners will hear from Presidents of organizations who are global change agents. We will also hear from CEOs of social enterprise businesses who are changing communities and college educators who are taking their students out of the classroom and into surrounding neighborhoods to learn and serve others.

 Join us on Saturday, March 16, 2013 to hear from Regina Prude, Chief Evangelist of Joy, and the wife of the late Dr. Floyd Prude Jr., as she share about the exciting Garnett-Nabrit Lectures series scheduled March 18-20, 2013 at American Baptist College. Tune in to hear about the stellar line up of speakers and musical guests as well the social justice history of American Baptist College.

American Baptist College was primarily a school designed to train African American Baptist ministers. The  student body has been influential in the civil rights movement for several decades.The small campus overlooks the Cumberland River has been nicked named the "Holy Hill". The college attracts students from around the country who desire an education that equips them for Christian leadership and service. Mrs. Prude's husband, a graduate of American Baptist College, served for many years as President of the American Baptist College Alumni Association and was a past Member of the Board of Trustees.

Living Your Best Life, a radio show that empowers, inspires and motivates one to live their BEST life, can heard on 760 AM in the Middle-Tennessee Region, military bases, and streamed live on U-Stream.TV from 9-10AM CST. (This show was aired on WTST, a member of the HBCU radio network.)


 More About Garnett-Nabrit Lecture Series




The Garnett-Nabrit Lecture Series was named in honor of the leadership of James Henry Garnett and James Madison Nabrit. Garnett was a teacher of Systematic Theology and New Testament Greek at American Baptist Theological Seminary from 1924 to 1938. He served as the seminary’s dean from 1927 to 1939. During a portion of that time, from 1930 to 1932, he provided leadership as the acting president.
James Madison Nabrit was president of American Baptist Theological Seminary from 1936 to 1944. His eight-year tenure advanced the institution and brought forth the development of the National Baptist Training School for Christian Workers.

Garnett and Nabrit are landmarks in the legacy of great leadership provided to American Baptist College. Their example of innovation and integrity are recognized annually through the Garnett-Nabrit Lecture Series.
Even in the midst of learning situations, there have been moments when that which is learned need to be enhanced, enriched and enlightened. This concept seemingly was in the mind of Dr. J. C. Miles as he, under the leadership of Dr. J. M. Nabrit, the President of American Baptist Theological Seminary, directed the first Missionary Conference in March, 1937.

There was also an Annual Conference on Pastoral Problems held in November, 1937, and was closed with a celebration of Founder’s Day. The conferences were combined at least by 1943 and continued each year until 1957.

In 1949 the conception of the Garnett-Nabrit Lectures was realized. At the Annual meeting of the Alumni Association held June 3, 1949, a committee (J. T. Moore, B. E. Callier, J. T. Ridley, W. N. Daniel, Charles Williams and William Donaldson) reported that they had polled the alumni throughout the country and received the majority of votes in favor of a Garnett-Nabrit Lecture.

It was not until 1957 that the birth of the Garnett-Nabrit Lectures was actualized. For in April 30 - May 1, 1957 meeting of the Board of Trustees, the vote was made to change the name of the Annual Ministers and Missionary conference to the Garnett-Nabrit lectures in honor of the former dean Dr. J. H. Garnett and Dr. J. M. Nabrit, fourth President of the Seminary.

The first Lecture Series was held April 30 - May 1, 1958, under the co-directorship of Professor Joseph M. Conley, Director of Seminary Extension, and Dr. Maynard P. Turner, President in 1964. The Alumni Association strengthened the Lecture Series by initiating an Alumni Banquet. Each year an alumnus is chosen by the Alumni Association to deliver the Banquet address.

More About American Baptist College

 Dr. Forrest E. Harris, Sr. President of American Baptist College


2011 Commencement Speaker,  John Seigenthaler, Sr.
The mission of ABC is educating, graduating and preparing a predominantly African American student population for Christian leadership, service and social justice in the world. The school offers a quality educational program with a liberal arts emphasis, equipping diverse students intellectually, morally, spiritually, socially and theologically.

The vision of ABC, a historically black college, founded in 1924 by black and white Baptists, is to provide educational opportunities for gifted students who have limited academic experiences and resources but unlimited potential for leadership in society. The school continues today firmly rooted in its historic purpose to promote higher education through a Christ-centered vision of the world for underserved students. This commitment entails the education of persons regardless of their age, class, ethnicity, gender or race in an environment that frees persons to be active learners, servant-leaders, and moral citizens of the world.

American Baptist College is a Christian College dedicated to educating and developing Christians for worldwide leadership and service. We are committed to providing men and women with an outstanding interdisciplinary undergraduate professional education in Bible, theology, and the social and natural sciences. We train both clergy and laity for the practice of Christian ministry and various professional social vocations. We believe in fostering an academic environment in which students and faculty dialogue about critical issues facing the church, society and world. Our holistic educational philosophy enhances the spiritual, intellectual, and social growth of our students. American Baptist College is a place where men and women can come to prepare for ministerial vocations in and beyond the church with a Christian theological understanding of the world.

Saturday, March 9, 2013

President of Rochester College on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

 Update: Audio of show can be found here.

Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes as we profile organizations and leaders who lead by example. With extraordinary acts of kindness and charitable giving that help countless lives daily, these organizations and leaders embody "Be the change you want to see in the world".

Throughout 2013 listeners will hear from Presidents of organizations who are global change agents. We will also hear from CEOs of social enterprise businesses who are changing communities and college educators who are taking their students out of the classroom and into surrounding neighborhoods to learn and serve others.

Join us on Saturday, March 9, 2013 to hear Dr. Rubel Shelly, President of Rochester College located Rochester Hills, Michigan. Listen as he shares about his years teaching Philosophy and Ethics in Nashville at Vanderbilt University and Tennessee State University. Hear Dr. Shelly discuss the importance of ethics as he talks about the Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, a book that is read widely on the campus of Rochester College. Dr. Shelly also talks about transitioning from college Professor to college President, and soon to be Rochester College's Chancellor.

Dr. Shelly shares information about educational opportunities for the growing community of veterans. He will share how the role of higher education will be key in writing the next chapters of their lives post military service.

 Living Your Best Life, a radio show that empowers, inspires and motivates one to live their BEST life, can heard on 760 AM in the Middle-Tennessee Region, military bases, and streamed live on U-Stream.TV from 9-10AM CST. (This show was aired on WTST, a member of the HBCU radio network.)

More About Rochester College 


Rochester College cultivates academic excellence, principled character, servant leadership, and global awareness through a rigorous educational experience that integrates liberal arts and professional studies within an inclusive Christian heritage.

Rochester College is committed to academic excellence. The College is accredited by the North Central Association of the Higher Learning Commission. Undergraduate concentrations in its Integrated Learning Model emphasize the importance of a liberal arts curriculum that models and teaches scholarly research, critical thinking, and effective communication skills in all fields of study.

Specialized programs in education, nursing, business, psychology, and religious studies prepare our graduates both for productive careers in the marketplace and for advanced studies at graduate and professional schools. Rochester College offers a Master’s Degree in religious education (MRE). The use of cutting-edge educational technology allows the delivery of courses in a variety of on-site and distance settings.

Rochester College cultivates the moral development of its students. The college affirms its commitment to holistic education that offers unique opportunities for faculty-student mentoring in our traditional campus program, degree-completion studies by adults in the College of Extended Learning (CEL) program, and online courses via a world-class technology platform. Working within a Judeo-Christian worldview, the school promotes an inclusive learning experience by welcoming students from all backgrounds, regions of the United States, and foreign countries.

The College affirms academic freedom and trains students with life skills beyond mere academic credentials. Men and women educated at Rochester College embrace challenge, apply problem-solving skills, serve their communities, and provide leadership for challenges yet to come. Deeply rooted in the Christian tradition, the College is non-sectarian in its approach to student recruitment and academic life.

Rochester College affirms and models social justice and servant leadership. Students, faculty, and staff interact to create a healthy environment of mutual respect. As people in preparation for a lifetime of growth and service, we participate in lively academic debate around important issues of our time.
The College promotes personal involvement in community service, cross-cultural engagement, political debate, and social responsibility. We are citizens of the world and have a responsibility beyond personal concerns, regional issues, or national trends. Well-educated and morally sensitive people are needed who can step up with intellect, character, and compassion to change our world for the better.

More About Dr. Rubel Shelly 




Rubel Shelly preached for the Family of God at Woodmont Hills in Nashville, Tennessee, from 1978 to 2005. During that time, he also taught at David Lipscomb University, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, and Tennessee State University. He has filled adjunct positions at Pepperdine University, Abilene Christian University, Emmanuel Seminary, and Kentucky Christian College. He became Visiting Professor of Religion and Philosophy at Rochester College, located in Rochester Hills, Michigan, in 2005, and began full-time duties there in June of 2006.

In addition to church and academic responsibilities, Shelly has worked actively with such community projects as Habitat for Humanity, American Red Cross, From Nashville With Love, Metro (Nashville) Public Schools, Faith Family Medical Clinic, and Operation Andrew Ministries.

He is the author or co-author of more than 30 books, including several which have been translated into languages such as Korean, Japanese, Portuguese, French, and Russian. He has published widely in religious journals.

Shelly has done short-term work in such places as Kenya, Uganda, South Africa, Brazil, Honduras, Germany, Bulgaria, Croatia, Russia, Ukraine, Poland, and the Czech Republic.

He holds degrees from Harding University (B.A.), Harding Graduate School of Religion (M.A., M.Th.), and Vanderbilt University (M.A., Ph.D.).

He is married to the former Myra Shappley, and they are the parents of three children: Mrs. David (Michelle) Arms, Tim, and Tom.








































Rochester College cultivates academic excellence, principled character, servant leadership, and global awareness through a rigorous educational experience that integrates liberal arts and professional studies within an inclusive Christian heritage.

Rochester College is committed to academic excellence. The College is accredited by the North Central Association of the Higher Learning Commission. Undergraduate concentrations in its Integrated Learning Model emphasize the importance of a liberal arts curriculum that models and teaches scholarly research, critical thinking, and effective communication skills in all fields of study.
Specialized programs in education, nursing, business, psychology, and religious studies prepare our graduates both for productive careers in the marketplace and for advanced studies at graduate and professional schools. Rochester College offers a Master’s Degree in religious education (MRE). The use of cutting-edge educational technology allows the delivery of courses in a variety of on-site and distance settings.
Rochester College cultivates the moral development of its students. The college affirms its commitment to holistic education that offers unique opportunities for faculty-student mentoring in our traditional campus program, degree-completion studies by adults in the College of Extended Learning (CEL) program, and online courses via a world-class technology platform. Working within a Judeo-Christian worldview, the school promotes an inclusive learning experience by welcoming students from all backgrounds, regions of the United States, and foreign countries.
The College affirms academic freedom and trains students with life skills beyond mere academic credentials. Men and women educated at Rochester College embrace challenge, apply problem-solving skills, serve their communities, and provide leadership for challenges yet to come. Deeply rooted in the Christian tradition, the College is non-sectarian in its approach to student recruitment and academic life.
Rochester College affirms and models social justice and servant leadership. Students, faculty, and staff interact to create a healthy environment of mutual respect. As people in preparation for a lifetime of growth and service, we participate in lively academic debate around important issues of our time.
The College promotes personal involvement in community service, cross-cultural engagement, political debate, and social responsibility. We are citizens of the world and have a responsibility beyond personal concerns, regional issues, or national trends. Well-educated and morally sensitive people are needed who can step up with intellect, character, and compassion to change our world for the better.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

The President's Cabinet Appointments Highlight Larger Issues in the Black Communitiy

President Obama made history again with his re-election. But his second term has been scrutinized by the left and the right. In his second term, his first round of nominees for his cabinet was white males. This caused some to question his loyalty to the millions of minorities, women,  and members of the GLBTs who elected him. When another Black business owner asked my thoughts about the lack of minorities being considered or appointed, I replied, “The issue is much bigger than black or white. Black Americans have allowed ‘white is right’ to become systemic in thinking. We, like White folks, have failed to embrace diversity or to accept our own for one reason or another. We have forgotten to look back at history and note that we did NOT overcome by ‘black is maybe but white is right.’ 

Let us take a look at how we arrived at the dilution of diversity by first looking at Affirmative Action. In the 1960s, at the height of the Civil Rights movement, we called on our elected leaders to challenge the country’s acceptance of the discrimination of Blacks in all areas of government contracting agencies. President Kennedy answered through his executive order, 10925, mandating “affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed and those employees are treated fairly during employment, without regard to race, creed, color, or national origin.”* Although a presidential executive order was being implemented and, in many cases, being enforced, Jim Crow, the law of the land in the Old South did not roll over and die. It took on a more covert way of staying a live by heavily saturating its principles of white is right into the enforcement of the new policies.

In the Old South, Jim Crow laws, written and unwritten, mandated where a Black person could sit, shop, eat, or use a restroom. Also, Jim Crow laws dictated how a Black person should look at a White person and how closely he should stand next to or walk beside a White person. Though Jim Crow was not the law of the land in the North, the North had its own insidious version. Blacks were systematically siphoned into areas of cities that were expressively ‘black’ and into jobs, schools, and the like that were considered ‘black’.

With dueling sets of laws--federal vs. state and local--once again our country found itself at war.  Although an undeclared war, our country was still fighting President Lincoln’s war a hundred years later. Instead of Confederate soldiers with cannons fighting for state’s rights to retain slaves in cotton fields, laws were instituted to confine Black people to horrible economic conditions equivalent to slavery with an invisible master.

After the death of President Kennedy, a new president, President Johnson addressed affirmative action. He stated, “Nothing is more freighted with meaning for our own destiny than the revolution of the Negro American...In far too many ways American Negroes have been another nation: deprived of freedom, crippled by hatred, the doors of opportunity closed to hope...But freedom is not enough. You do not wipe away the scars of centuries by saying: Now you are free to go where you want, and do as you desire, and choose the leaders you please. You do not take a person who, for years, has been hobbled by chains and liberate him, bring him up to the starting line of a race and then say, 'you are free to compete with all the others,' and still justly believe that you have been completely fair...This is the next and the more profound stage of the battle for civil rights. We seek not just freedom but opportunity. We seek not just legal equity but human ability, not just equality as a right and a theory but equality as a fact and equality as a result...To this end equal opportunity is essential, but not enough, not enough.**   

Every President has served a racially divided country. And rules are not always the same for every racial group in interpretation and implementation. There are racial divisions, in spite of all of our accomplishments as a nation; and these divisions seem to pull at the fibers of our country despite our ever increasing growth of minorities who have become national leaders, business owners, college presidents, astronauts, and even pest-control operators. In every genre, great men and women from every ethnic background have defied odds to add to the rich diversity of this nation, even electing a President whose parents are members of two races, not once but twice. Yet the President struggles with an issue inherent in the belief of a very large number of folks in this country: white is right, that is, white American male is right.

Under President Obama, the unwritten rules of how business gets done in our country have not changed. While these unwritten rules present both opportunities and obstacles for working with congressional and business leaders, the President must deal with perception just as much as reality. In reality, a majority of voting Americans voted for President Obama. But the perception is that more did not vote for him. No matter how many numbers show the wide margin of his win, by design, the President’s opposition rack up more air time on cable news shows than those who support him. 

Along the same lines of reality vs. perception, because a corporation says it believes in diversity or has a minority supplier program does not mean that the culture of the company is accepting of diverse individuals, which includes Congress, an entity that governs the business affairs of our country. Although our country has become more diverse, there are members of Congress who struggle with the idea of diversity. One reason, diversity cannot be pigeon-holed into the paradigm, “American white male is right.” 

At one time, Black Americans were the largest minority group. When diversity programs were mentioned, it was the code for “We do business with Blacks.” But in the last decade, doing business with Black Americans was no longer a litmus test for diversity. Diversity has grown to mean global inclusiveness. Women, individuals with physical disabilities, and members within the GLBT communities are all part of diversity inclusion. Many are CEOs or senior management decision-makers for global corporations. 

Because of global diversity, minorities, who may not even consider themselves as a minority, are sitting at the table as decision-makers and do not need executive orders to be given access to employment, housing, or an education. By the way, Hispanics/Latinos are the majority of the minority groups. But Asian business owners are the fastest growing in our nation and are one of the highest income earners.

Culturally speaking, most minority groups turn first to each other’s businesses for goods or services before venturing outside of their communities. By being intentional with their spending dollars, these communities are strengthened economically and engender more buying power. Local power combined with fiscal numbers gives them a seat at the table for national dialogue. These communities become producers vs. consumers. When communities are strong producers of their own wealth by doing business within their communities, they can intimidate or become intimidating to outsiders.

If a community allows an entity to divide and conquer it without much opposition, the community soon becomes a doormat and gets very little to nothing in return from the entity. Instead, the community should take a page out of the book of another community that appears to have successful business practices, especially of diverse ethnic groups, and demand reciprocity at a comparable rate. Black Americans are slow in accepting this concept.

Some local Black business owners rarely have a community-first mindset. In Nashville, Black- owned means ‘last-selected’and 'less-than-your-quoted-price' to other Blacks when buying. It does not matter what area of town one may in reside; it seems to be the prevailing thought. “Nashville’s Black Elite” can be the worst offenders while screaming for economic inclusion from corporate America. When asked about this practice, “You know how we are,” is the standard reply. As far as Blacks have come in leading the way to gain equality for others, we are often last in helping one another to achieve or maintain economic stability in our businesses, to support our families, to give back to our communities, and to prepare to contribute to national dialogue, not photo opportunities.

Our national leaders have much work to do, both moral and legislative work. Our country issues are bigger than Black and White issues, much bigger. As the President works through years of systemic racial biases [he must do] that are woven into the fibers of our country, he must intentionally choose leaders who will embrace our growing global diversity and who will practice inclusiveness. In the same vein, Black business owners must work through years of being treated as inferior. For many have begun to believe that the goods and services of our own people are ‘less than.’ Hence, Black business owners [as a whole] need a new paradigm shift that can remove the systemic thinking that has inculcated and has embedded into the fibers of the community.

To make the shift, Black business owners should begin to intentionally seek out goods and services of one another. This action will help strengthen dialogue within the Black community. They have to become educated in the ways and means of the global marketers and use the finesse of the dialogue of the smaller community to access the larger global market. They must keep in mind that this training is pertinent to opening the doors to financial empowerment.

If Black Americans do not embrace and complement each other like leveling compounds running on an uneven floor, we will continue to be overlooked at the table for national conversations and leadership roles and will continue to be stepped on or stepped over. But in order to change this, we must start with the man or woman in the mirror, not the President. Economic empowerment starts in your neighborhood and local communities not in Washington, DC.

*President John F. Kennedy’s Executive Order 10925 was signed March 6, 1961
** President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Commencement Address at Howard University Commencement June 4, 1965


Saturday, March 2, 2013

Chuck Beard and David Walker to Speak at Brentwood Woman's Club Celebration of Youth Reception


 On Saturday, March 2, 2013 Brentwood Woman's Club (BWC) will host its annual Celebration of Youth Writers and Artists' reception. The reception will honor finalists who entered the BWC's fall and winter short story, poetry, and art contests for Williamson County Students.

This year, contestants will hear from local individuals who thrive in the writing and creative arts communities.



Chuck Beard is the author of Adventures inside A Bright Sky, writes a blog for nashvillesheART.com, is the editor of Number Inc.-arts publication covering art happenings in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Tennessee, and is the owner of East Side Story Bookstore, a book store that for local authors.


East Side Story is more than Nashville’s first, all-local bookstore.  East Side Story is more than a platform for Nashville-area writers to tell their best story while igniting, teaching, and encouraging the spirit of reading and writing in others.  East Side Story is an idea; a blank canvas for all local literary ideas to help make Music City more of a book town.

East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf

As a entrepreneur and artist, David Walker has taken on the role of supporting businesses and organizations in their branding and marketing ventures. In operation for over 8 years, his company, Rhealistic, has done business with organizations, large and small, all over the country. Primarily working with universities and businesses, David has found his stride providing graphic and web design needs. As the design community has recognized the struggle of the print community, David has embraced the task of providing web solutions to those very same companies. In addition to being a business owner, David is an Associate Professor of Graphic Design at Middle Tennessee State University. He serves as the Education Chair of AIGA Nashville, the local chapter of the national design organization, AIGA and is on the Student Advisory Committee at the Frist Center.

David is a graduate of Tennessee State University and the University of Memphis, attaining a Bachelors of Fine Art in studio arts (2004) and an Master of Fine Art in Graphic Design (2011).

Today's reception will be held at FiftyForward's Martin Center, 960 Heritage Way, Brentwood, TN from 2-4pm CST. 
 
More About the Brentwood Woman's Club

The GFWC Brentwood Woman’s Club (BWC) is proud to be celebrating its 40th year of community service in the Brentwood area. We are a part of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs (GFWC), an international women’s organization dedicated to community improvement by enhancing the lives of others through volunteer service. GFWC’s history can be traced back to 1868, and now is the largest, oldest, nonpartisan, nondenominational, international volunteer service organization of women in the world.

BWC educational support includes monetary donations to local schools for library books and art supplies; musical equipment and supplies; and three $1000 college scholarships to local students.

East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf

East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
East Side Story sets itself apart because of its focus on Nashville authors. “Here the stars are local writers, whose books will be right next to New York Times Bestsellers,” Chuck says. He knows the importance of supporting local writers — a self-published author, he’s passionate about giving talent a chance to be seen and read. - See more at: http://thedailysouth.southernliving.com/2012/08/08/nashvilles-new-literary-hub-east-side-story/#sthash.hdNgdzFk.dpuf
Adventures Inside a Bright-Eyed Sky
Adventures Inside a Bright-Eyed Sky
Adventures Inside a Bright-Eyed Sky
Adventures Inside a Bright-Eyed Skywrites an blog for nashvillesheART.com and is the editor of Number Inc.-arts publication covering art happenings in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Tennessee. Chuck i

Friday, March 1, 2013

HBCU Digest Founder Jarrett Carter on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

 Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes as we profile organizations and leaders who lead by example. With extraordinary acts of kindness and charitable giving that help countless lives daily, these organizations and leaders embody "Be the change you want to see in the world".

Throughout 2013 listeners will hear from presidents of organizations who are global change agents. We will also hear from CEOs of social enterprise businesses who are changing communities and college educators who are taking their students out of the classroom and into surrounding neighborhoods to learn and serve others.

Alcorn State University 2012 HBCU of the Year
On Saturday,  March 2, 2013 we continue to hear from powerful voices in higher education  as we welcome HBCUDigest.com founder, Jarrett Carter. Tune in to hear why Jarrett Carter, an HBCU alum, began an online daily news site dedicated to the coverage of HBCUs. Listen as Jarrett Carter discusses HBCU Digest, the role and relevancy of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and the upcoming 3rd Annual HBCU Awards. Hear his insights on past HBCU School of the Year winners and why recognizing the accomplishments of HBCUs are important.

Jarret will also share why the importance of teaching media advocacy to HBCUs  should be part of every school's strategic plan for long term growth and stability while competing for the best and brightest students  now and in the future.

Living Your Best Life, radio that empowers, inspires, and motivates you to live your BEST life, is heard on 760AM in the Middle Tennessee Region, the Inspirational Network, military bases and lived streamed at Ustream.TV from 9-10AM CST.

More About Jarrett Carter

Jarrett Carter, Founder of HBCU Digest

Jarrett L. Carter Sr. is the Founding Editor of HBCUDigest.com, an online daily news blog dedicated to coverage of historically black colleges and universities throughout the United States. He is also the host of HBCU Digest Radio, a weekly talk radio program covering societal, cultural and institutional issues at HBCUs, and the Founder and Executive Director of the Center for HBCU Media Advocacy, a national non-profit organization working to enhance HBCUs' new media and media outreach opportunities.

A native of Seat Pleasant, MD., Carter graduated from Morgan State University in 2003 with a Bachelor's degree in English with a journalism concentration.

Carter lives in Baltimore with his wife, Dr. La Keita D. Carter and two sons, Jarrett Jr. and Landen.

More About HBCU Digest


 The HBCU Digest is a daily blog/news curation resource, providing news synopsis, links and commentary on stories about America’s historically black colleges and universities. Started in January 2010, the site has grown from a news aggregation site (taking portions of content from other sources) to providing breaking news from outlets throughout the United States, original features and editorials, and special content unique to HBCU students and alumni culture. The HBCU Digest is also available on a weekly worldwide Internet broadcast, HBCU Digest Radio, which can be heard Thursdays at 6 p.m. EST.

Select editorials from the Digest are syndicated on the Huffington Post. Headlines from all HBCU Digest posts, along with regular commentary and reader Q&A’s are syndicated on Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus. Content is also available through RSS feed. The Digest is published Monday through Saturday.

The HBCU Digest delivers news and information on all aspects of HBCU culture. Student life, alumni affairs, leadership, community, entertainment and sports. The Digest solicits press releases and media advisories from HBCUs and organizations supporting HBCUs.

The HBCU Digest is regularly read by HBCU students, alumni and administrators. Additionally, the Digest is a popular resource for editors and reporters looking for in-depth information on HBCUs. In 2011, the Digest was read by more than 250,000 people in all 50 states and in more than 173 countries around the world – about four times the attendance of the largest HBCU football classic in the country, the Magic City Classic between Alabama A&M and Alabama State.