Sunday, October 28, 2012

Bayonets and Horses Society Announces First Time Political Endorsement





After much debate between members, the Bayonets and Horses Society endorsed a Presidential Candidate for the first time in the organization's history. Bayonets and horses have long been used in wars dating back to 16th century.

A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife, sword, or spike-shaped weapon designed to fit in, on, over or underneath the muzzle of a rifle, musket or similar weapon, effectively turning the gun into a spear. In this regard, it is an ancillary close-quarter combat or last-resort weapon.

However, knife-shaped bayonets—when not fixed to a gun barrel—have long been utilized by soldiers in the field as general purpose cutting implements. The bayonet has become a symbol of military power. The term "at the point of a bayonet" refers to using military force or action to accomplish, maintain, or defend something (cf. Bayonet Constitution). Undertaking a task 'with fixed bayonets' has this connotation of no room for compromise and is a phrase used particularly in politics.*

The first use of horses in warfare occurred over 5,000 years ago. The earliest evidence of horses ridden in warfare dates from Eurasia between 4000 and 3000 BC. A Sumerian illustration of warfare from 2500 BC depicts some type of equine pulling wagons. By 1600 BC, improved harness and chariot designs made chariot warfare common throughout the Ancient Near East, and the earliest written training manual for war horses was a guide for training chariot horses written about 1350 BC. As formal cavalry tactics replaced the chariot, so did new training methods, and by 360 BC, the Greek cavalry officer Xenophon had written an extensive treatise on horsemanship. The effectiveness of horses in battle was also revolutionized by improvements in technology, including the invention of the saddle, the stirrup, and later, the horse collar.*

The Bayonets and Horses Society exists to educate world leaders on the importance of staying up to date on modern military equipment used during war and teaching the history of past military wars failures and accomplishments.

Credits:  *www.wikipedia.org
Graphics: Rhealistic Branding

Friday, October 26, 2012

Crissy Haslam and Ephie Ballard Johnson on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes as we profile organizations and leaders who lead by example. With extraordinary acts of kindness and charitable giving that help countless lives daily, these organizations and leaders embody "Be the change you want to see in the world". Hear from CEOs of social enterprise businesses who are changing communities and founders of networks that are changing how business is done by changing the rules, one conversation at a time.


On Saturday, October 27, 2012, tune in to hear Tennessee's First Lady, Crissy Haslam, and Memphis Song Bird, Ephie Ballard Johnson, discuss First Ladies for Healthy Babies. First Ladies For Healthy Babies is an initiative that was launched with members of the faith-based community in Memphis in support of the Operation Smart Child program in June of 2011.

Operation Smart Child is a family outreach and education initiative of the Neighborhood Christian Centers, in partnership with The Urban Child Institute in Memphis. It is designed to impact the mental, social, economic, and spiritual lives of children through early brain development strategies and interventions. Since the Memphis launch last year, Crissy Haslam has kicked off Nashville's First Ladies for Healthy Babies in April and will lauch the Knoxville area's event on November 8, 2012.

Crissy Haslam and Ephie Johnson will share what inspired them to address the needs of the youngest Tennesseans while emphasizing the important role that parents play as their child’s first teacher. Both leading ladies will also shares how families can help eliminate healthcare and educational disparities in the Volunteer State, like reading twenty minutes a day to a child.

Living Your Best Life can be heard  on 760AM in the Middle Tennessee Region, streaming live online at UStream.TV and on military bases on Saturdays from 9:00-10am CST. Crissy Haslam's interview was originally aired on XM's HBCU Channel on WTST.

More About Crissy Haslam




Born in Houston, Texas, Crissy Haslam moved with her family to Memphis, Tennessee when she was eight years old. She attended St. Mary's Episcopal School in Memphis and continued on to Emory University for college, where she served as the Vice-President of the Business School Council. Crissy graduated from Emory in 1980 with a double major in Finance and Marketing in the College of Business.

Crissy married Bill Haslam and moved to Knoxville in 1981. While working as the assistant director of admissions for UT-Knoxville, she received a Master of Science degree in Education in the program of College Student Personnel.

She has served on numerous civic and community boards, and currently serves as chair of the Tennessee Executive Residence Foundation.

Crissy and Bill have 3 grown children.

As First Lady of Tennessee, Crissy has introduced a three-part initiative that focuses on the interplay between family engagement and literacy improvement in Tennessee. She has been traveling the state to stress the importance of parents as first teachers, parents as education partners, and also to raise awareness for the exponential value of reading on grade level by the 3rd grade.

Crissy Haslam's social media sites are: Twitter , Facebook, YouTube, and Website.

More About Ephie Ballard Johnson 


Ephie Johnson, president and CEO of the Neighborhood Christian Centers, was born in Memphis just six days after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was killed. Although born during a troubling time, Johnson believes that Memphis is filled with potential and has spent her life working with those less fortunate than herself.

She considers her parents, Dr. JoeAnn and the late Monroe Ballard, to be extraordinary role models when it comes to giving back.

"All my life," she said, "I've known giving through my parents' eyes."
As she was growing up, her parents mentored more than 75 girls from impoverished or at-risk homes, helping them to become young, independent people.

It was through this work and through a desire to help others that Johnson's mother co-founded what is now known as the Neighborhood Christian Centers.

The Neighborhood Christian Center is a faith-based organization that serves entire families and has seven full-service sites in Memphis and numerous satellite and chapter affiliations.
But even with service being her family's lifeblood, Johnson initially shied away from that direct path, choosing instead to be a teacher. But as she taught, Johnson realized that she was more like her parents than she had thought.

After marrying and moving away to Alabama, Johnson moved back to Memphis to become her mother's apprentice believing that "God was grooming me according to His plan for me."
While working alongside her mother at the Neighborhood Christian Center for 13 years, Johnson drove the van, painted the walls, cooked in the kitchen , counseled clients, and learned the ministry of serving people -- earning everything she could about the mission of the Neighborhood Christian Centers and how to minister to those it serves. She formally took over as CEO in May 2008.
Johnson also hosts the "FaithForum" on FOX Memphis and serves as the choir director for Hope Presbyterian Church, where she enjoys sharing her love of song.

"God gave me a singing ability and a desire to share through song," she said. "Plus, it's important to have something outside of my day-to-day world."

Excerpt above from The Commercial Appeal. 
More About Ephie Ballard Johnson can be found here.

Living Your Best Life would like to thank media partners: WTST The Blaze at TSU, 760 The Gospel, Mocha Market Magazine, Rhealistic Branding and News Channel 5 Urban Outlook.

Story on First Ladies for Healthy Babies written by Genma Holmes can be found here.

Photo Credits: State of TN except Crissy Haslam and Genma Holmes (John Cross)
                        

Friday, October 19, 2012

Lambda Theta Alpha, Iris Montes, and Jennifer Reyes on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes as we profile organizations and leaders who lead by example. With extraordinary acts of kindness and charitable giving that help countless lives daily, these organizations and leaders embody "Be the change you want to see in the world".

Hear from Greek fraternities and sororities who are global change agents. We will also hear from CEOs of social enterprise businesses who are changing communities and college educators who are taking their students out of the classroom and into surrounding neighborhoods for real world life lessons and to serve others. Listen to young men and women who are energized to help make a differences in their communities and regions by challenging status quo and shattering glass ceilings.

 On Saturday, October 20, 2012, tune in to learn about the first Latina Sorority in the US, Lambda Theta Alpha. Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) 's journalism student, Iris Montes, President of MTSU's Delta Iota Chapter of Lambda Theta Alpha, will share about the sorority's rich history and  mission. We will also hear from Jennifer Reyes, news reporter with News Channel 5, about her life as journalist and celebrity reporter. Our show will  be compelling as we hear from Iris who is preparing for a career in journalism and electronic media while active in many organizations and Jennifer, a media veteran, who has covered the news in several cities, hosted a magazine show, and produced segments in other countries.

Living Your Best Life, a radio show that empowers, inspires and motivates one to live their BEST life, can heard on 760 AM in the Middle-Tennessee Region, military bases, and streamed live on U-Stream.TV from 9-10AM CST.

More About Lambda Theta Alpha

Colors: Burgundy and Grey Principles:
Unity, Love and Respect
Goals: Scholarly excellence, empowerment of Latinas and the universal woman, cultural and political awareness, and community activism.

Founded at Kean University, in NJ in December of 1975.

Lambda Theta Alpha was the first sorority ever created to cater towards the needs of Latinas in the nation.

The purpose of the organization is to create a support group for Latinas in higher education, and unite the Latino community on campus.

Lambda Theta Alpha was established as an academic sorority. LTA is not an exclusionary organization.

The LTA National Philanthropy is St. Jude Children's Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.


Lambda Theta Alpha is a member of the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO).

Lambda Theta Alpha is a fully insured organization which covers all of its chapters. Each chapter of Lambda Theta Alpha is recognized by its respective institution. Sisters at each chapter enjoy complete participation in campus activities.

Lambda Theta Alpha has established Alumnae Chapters. Lambda Theta Alpha has established Graduate Chapters. Lambda Theta Alpha has established chapters throughout New Jersey, Connecticut, Puerto Rico, New York, Maryland, Florida, California, Pennsylvania, Texas, Arizona, Michigan, Illinois, Virginia, Tennessee, New Mexico, Wisconsin, Georgia, Idaho, North Carolina and Washington.

Lambda Theta Alpha is proud to be recognized as the 2000-2001, 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 recipient of the Sorority of the Year award from NALFO and Latinogreeks.com.
Orientation: Women of all ethnicities.

More About Iris Montes


Iris Montes, 21, is a third-year student at Middle Tennessee State University. She was born and raised in Jacksonville, FL. At the age of 15, she moved to Tennessee. She started studying at MTSU in Fall, 2010. Iris has is majoring in Electronic Media Journalism, and Global Studies. She became a member of the Delta Iota Chapter of Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority Incorporated, in Spring 2011 and is currently president of the Delta Iota Chapter of Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority Inc. and vice president of the Multicultural Greek Council. Iris is also a founding member of "Better Together," an Interfaith Organization, on MTSU's campus.

More About Jennifer Reyes


Jennifer Reyes joined the NewsChannel 5 This Morning team in March 2012.
Jennifer grew up in Indianapolis and graduated from Ball State University with a Marketing degree. She got her start in news in her hometown of Indianapolis working for the local Univision affiliate, first as a weather anchor and later as a news anchor and producer.

While at Univision, she interviewed many local and national celebrities, and broke stories that got national and international attention. Four years later, wanting to expand her knowledge in the business, she went on to work for WITI, the FOX affiliate in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She joined their news team first as a helicopter traffic reporter and later as a general assignment and feature weekend reporter.

Following her four-year stint at FOX, she moved back to Indianapolis where she worked as a freelance reporter for the #1 station in the market, NBC affiliate WTHR. While there she contributed reports to NBC, MSNBC, and Telemundo.

Before moving to Nashville, Jennifer worked as a celebrity reporter for US Weekly and Life & Style Weekly in Los Angeles, California. She also produced and hosted a local magazine style show and worked for executive producers Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony.

Jennifer is a true bilingual reporter fluent in both written and spoken Spanish and English. One of her greatest career achievements include having the opportunity to travel to Mexico to produce a segment for PBS.

In her free time, Jennifer enjoys traveling, reading, exercising and checking out new restaurants.

Friday, October 5, 2012

ColorComm's Lauren Wesley Wilson on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

 Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes as we profile organizations and leaders who lead by example. With extraordinary acts of kindness and charitable giving that help countless lives daily, these organizations and leaders embody "Be the change you want to see in the world". Hear from CEOs of social enterprise businesses who are changing communities and founders of networks that are changing how business done by changing the rules, one conversation at a time.

On Saturday, October 6, 2012 hear from Lauren Wesley Wilson, who is a dynamic game changer in the world of communications and public relations. A child of a pr guru, the apple did not fall far from the tree. Lauren will share how she built a network to help connect other like minded young women of color with senior level women in the communications field. Her decision to not let others "no" deter her has turned a lunch meeting into an thriving membership community that meets monthly to empower, to inspire, and to motivate one another.

 Living Your Best Life, a radio show that empowers, inspires and motivates one to live their BEST life, can be heard on 760 AM in the Middle-Tennessee Region, Inspiration Network, military bases, and streamed live on U-Stream.TV from 9-10AM CST.





 More About ColorComm
ColorComm is an essential organization for women of color in communications. In a field where there are often less than a handful of us at a professional meeting or networking event, ColorComm provides this niche group the opportunity to see, learn and hear from highly successful women of color. ColorComm is also for women who have achieved great success who are looking for new opportunities that will stimulate, educate, and broaden their horizons.  Communications fields include: public relations, corporate communications, media relations, political communications and others.

The ColorComm mission is to personally connect women with other like-minded individuals to build a strong network of leaders by creating mentors/mentees, business relationships and friendships. ColorComm offers a unique opportunity for women to share experiences and learn from one another to enhance their personal and professional development.

It Started With Lunch
A group of 30 women gathered for the first luncheon in May 2011 at an upscale restaurant in Washington, D.C. Several luncheons later, these invite-only events with top-level guest speakers have become the most sought-after ticket in the District and beyond for professional women of color in communications.

Based on feedback from participants who expressed a desire for more opportunities to connect, ColorComm evolved into a membership organization. Membership allows ColorComm to expand its programming, networking and partnerships to create the most meaningful and dynamic experiences for our exclusive, member community.

Excerpt from Pamela's Punch:
 PP:  How did the idea of ColorComm begin?
LWW:  The idea for ColorComm began when I was working in the PR agency world. It was an environment that was based on hierarchy, sweatshop mentality, and a cut throat atmosphere. My path to a promotion and success was often unclear. At the time I was looking for a mentor to help guide me and provide strategic insight on how to achieve my best and get to the next level. So I began actively seeking out a mentor. I attended every professional development seminar, networking session, panel discussion that you could imagine. I was looking to meet anyone who cared enough to give me 15 minutes of their time.

What I’ve found and eventually learned, is that most people really don’t want to give up their time to people that they don’t know or someone who didn’t come recommended. What’s in it for them? And honestly, how many times have they done this before? I can remember that there was one Senior Vice President at Fleishman-Hillard that I was dying to get to know and dying to hear from, and it took an entire year (July 2009-July 2010) for me to meet with her. I get it, I wasn’t a priority! But, I wasted time. I was so focused on that one person, and at the end of the day there was 0 connection. The “mentor hunt” was unsuccessful.

I thought to myself, there has got to be an easier way to meet executive level communicators. How about we put them all in one room over lunch and that way we have an opportunity to hear from them, learn from them, and connect with them. No more getting the runaround! I knew I wasn’t the only one who felt that way. Thus, the idea for ColorComm was created. Since the first luncheon in May 2011, it became apparent that there was a hunger for more interaction among women of color in communications. Our unique questions were not being answered and we needed to connect with other like-minded women. ColorComm began with a luncheon series and now is transitioning into a membership community, and it’s the most amazing thing to watch evolve
.

 Pamela's Punch Full Interview with Lauren Wesley Wilson can be found here.
 Photos from previous events can be found here.

Jennifer Cole and Rebecca Berrios on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes will celebrate Artober Nashville throughout the month of October with the Frist Center for the Visual Arts and the Metro Arts Commission. Tune in as we shine the spotlight on art, culture, history, and community.


On Saturday, October 6, 2012 join us to hear Jennifer Cole and Rebbecca Berrios of the Metropolitan Arts Commission. Hear them share how Artober Nashville has grown by leaps and bounds in less than two years and how the city of Nashville's growing art scene helps us to embrace the rich, diverse, cultural growth of our region. Jennifer and Rebecca will give us an overview of the month and share how art the art community "inspire people through art to look at their world in new ways".  Artober Nashville is a one stop portal to finding events in theater, music, art, and dance from October 1-31in Music City.
  
Living Your Best Life, radio that empowers, inspires, and motivates you to live your BEST life, is heard on 760AM in the Middle Tennessee Region, the Inspirational Network, military bases and live streamed at Ustream.TV from 9-10AM CST.

More About Jennifer Cole and Rebecca Berrios


Jennifer Cole stepped into the role of Executive Director of the Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission in 2009. After success at the helm of numerous high-profile national projects with Points of Light Institute and Hands On Network, she brings a unique skill set to public art in Nashville. Cole recently released the Creative Vitality Index Report—a survey that put the creative character of this city into tangible terms. Through hard data, Cole uses this survey to tell the story of the centrality of the arts in Nashville. Gifted with a vision for the future and grounded by a sense of responsibility to Nashville’s roots, Cole is taking public art in the Music City to the next level.
Excerpt from Nashville Arts Magazine





Rebecca Berrios  is the Community Events Manager for the Metropolitian Nashville Arts. Rebecca joined Metro Arts in July 2011. Her role as community project coordinator includes managing the Gallery and the Artist Registry, coordinating Artober Nashville and leading various initiatives to expand and support the arts in Nashville.
 

 More About Artober Nashville


Artober Nashville is a month-long celebration of arts and culture in Nashville, designed to inform and inspire the community’s awareness of and participation in the array of activities during the month of October. It is held in conjunction with National Arts and Humanities Month, designated by Americans for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. The goal for Artober Nashville is for every Nashvillian to experience the arts. The Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission and NowPlayingNashville partner with dozens of arts and cultural organizations throughout Nashville to highlight the depth and breadth of arts activities with official Artober Nashville events. The celebration includes all arts and cultural activities, including visual and performing arts, music, craft, film and commercial businesses that may present arts activities. Enjoy an Artober Nashville signature event during the month. Purchase an Artober VIP Pass. Find out more about the Yelp Check-In Challenge. Connect with Artober Nashville on Facebook and Twitter to share updates and events with friends and family!

History
In recognition of National Arts and Humanities Month, the Metro Nashville Arts Commission and NowPlayingNashville.com hosted the first Artober Nashville celebration in October 2011. They partnered with more than 160 arts and cultural organizations to highlight the depth and breadth of arts activities with official Artober Nashville events. More than 660 events were posted through NowPlayingNashville.com on the Artober Nashville website.

Partnering organizations included: the Nashville Symphony, Ballet, Opera; TPAC; Tennessee Repertory Theatre; Frist Center for the Visual Arts; Film Nashville; Nashville Shakespeare Festival; Street Theatre; Watkins College of Art, Design & Film; NECAT; Jazz Workshop; Southern Word; Global Education Center; Nashville Public Library; Belcourt Theatre; Arts & Business Council; Actor’s Bridge Ensemble; the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; the International Black Film Festival; Fifth Avenue of the Arts; Nashville in Harmony and Vanderbilt University.

National Arts and Humanities Month

 Every day we celebrate the arts, but October is the month to commemorate the arts in a big way. It is National Arts and Humanities Month—the largest annual celebration for the arts and humanities in the nation! National Arts and Humanities Month (NAHM) is a coast-to-coast collective recognition of the importance of culture in America. It is designed to encourage all Americans to explore new facets of the arts and humanities in their lives, and to begin a lifelong habit of active participation in the arts and humanities. From hosting a Creative Conversation or arts center open house to securing a mayoral proclamation or better newspaper coverage of the arts, people in every community across the United States can celebrate NAHM by helping recognize the contributions of cultural organizations in their region.

Text INSPIRE to 99000 to win a VIP Pass
Text INSPIRE to 99000 to win a membership the Frist Center

Photo credit: Jennifer Cole/Nashville Arts Magazine
                      In Studio shots/Genma Holmes