Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Teaching Children to Love to Learn


I grew up in a community that is now known as one of the poorest counties in Mississippi. When I return home for family visits, poverty is on every corner. Buildings that were once housed prosperous family businesses are now boarded up or burned down. Most residents work out of town or are unemployed. Whenever I ask my mother, a lifelong educator, about the stark contrast from the town that was part of my childhood, she replies in a sad voice, “Education, education, education. We stopped teaching children to read for the love of reading. We stopped teaching children to dream big dreams. This is what you get.” To my mother, education and economics are inseparable. She often told me, “Without an education, options are few. An educated community is crucial to its survival. Part of that survival is teaching children to learn to enjoy learning”. One of my mother’s core beliefs is to teach children to love to learn and they will become big dreamers. Big dreamers invest in their communities.

My mother taught me to love to read. My reading led me to becoming a dreamer. Dreaming taught me to face life without fear or hesitation. Reading was also my escape from country life. I grew up in household with very little extras but I had an abundance of everything. I was surrounded by educators, professionals, and kinfolks who showed me how things were done by allowing me to see them in their career settings. I also saw them with books in their hands at every turn.

I read books before I started school. My earliest memory of reading was to my grandfather. He would sit in his Lazy Boy chair rocking back and forth while I read to him from my small chair. Because he was hard of hearing, I read at the top of my voice. He had the patient of Job as I read one story after another. Reading to my grandfather was a routine I continued to end of his life. As an adult, my return visits to my grandparents always included stacks of magazines and newspaper from other cities. I would eagerly share with him who I met and where I have been while I read to him articles from places he never got to visit. He would smile and grin and give commentary on the politics and economics of municipalities as if he lived in each one.

When my grandfather became ill, I returned to Mississippi until he passed. Every evening, I read stories to him. Every evening. Often, I wondered if he heard me but I read to him anyway as I did as a child. Loudly. Bible passages, novels, news stories, even some of my favorite childhood books was read to him until he took his last breath.

My love of reading to my grandfather has transitioned to reading to school age children in area schools. I realized that my interactions with the many children I see during the holidays as Ms. Santa must go beyond giving them toys with a temporary shelf life. Catherine Ramsey, a lifelong educator and fellow book club member, taught me by her actions at Christmas. As a gift to her, she only wanted book club members to give books to young girls. She wanted to plant seeds of loving to read while they were young. Catherine Ramsey has never met my family but their philosophies about life and education are exactly the same.

Private, public, charter schools, and daycares have all called me to visit their schools to read. I have donned my famous Ms. Santa suit for the Girl Scouts. I have been the Queen of Hearts for Valentine Day and I have dressed as a Leprechaun to cheer on test scores in March for Buena Vista Enhanced Option School. I have been Spiderwoman at Grace Eaton and a Reading Princess at Hull-Jackson Montessori. Name a holiday or occasion and I have a costume to help incorporate into a story. My visits may seem outlandish to the casual observer but many educators encourage me to come often. My visits also bring community into the classroom and introduce children to professionals who not only work but serve. I have managed to recruit other entrepreneurs to join me. Why should I have all the fun?

My visits with the school children are not limited to the classroom. Escorting several classes, community groups, and families to the Frist Center helps incorporate the arts into story telling that is meant to encourage loving to learn. The visits to the Frist Center at the beginning of the school year have helped several students along with their families to become museum regulars. I have been told by parents and teachers alike that they have seen improvements in test scores and attention spans. The students come to the Frist Center to create their masterpieces inspired by their favorite books they have read at school.

No matter where a child attends school, all villagers must be active participants in helping create environments where loving to learn is at the forefront. We must all look for ways to make learning engaging and exciting to equip the next generation to help keep our communities vibrant and economically strong. Loving to learn produces big dreamers. And big dreamers invest in their villages and communities.

Monday, May 28, 2012

25th Anniversary of Biennial Symposium on Minorities, the Medically Underserved & Health Equity

The Pros and Cons of Charter Schools

Most large family gatherings have the normal family disagreements. But if you ever want to ruin a “good argument” during the holidays, just mention charter schools around the educators in my family. At the dinner table sit female educators who are teachers, principals, and college professors who will send the turkey and dressing running for cover at the very mention of charter schools. The topic of charter schools is hotly disputed between my mother and my aunts who believe “the devil is in the details”. Asking these fervently experienced Titans of education to explain why they love or loath the idea of charter schools minus the passion has left me, occasionally, looking for the turkey and dressing’s hiding place.

As Governor Haslam has lifted the ban on the number of charter schools statewide, we will see more charter schools forming. The reasons for allowing more charter schools are as numerous as the stars above but it is important to review some of the pros and cons of charter schools. *

Pro: Charter schools provide families with public school choice options. Parents will have the ability to choose the school best suited for their child.
Con: Charter schools, due to their small size and limited numbers, will provide only some families with public school choice options, thereby raising issues of fairness and equity.

Pro: Charter schools can act as laboratories of reform, identifying successful practices that could be replicated by traditional district public schools. Also, by waiving regulations in a limited number of schools, the most prohibitive policies can be identified and eliminated for all schools.
Con: Successful reform models such as New American Schools and Core Knowledge have already been identified. Why not attempt these reforms in existing schools? If rules and regulations are so burdensome, they should be waived for all public schools.

Pro: Through school choice, competition within the public school system is created, pressuring school districts to reassess their educational practices.
Con: Charter schools have an unfair advantage when competing against district public schools since they tend to be smaller and free from regulations. Charter schools have access to federal funds and other revenue sources.

Pro: Charters will lead to overall systemic reform through the pressure and competition of the choice mechanism.
Con: Charters are too limited in scope to adequately pressure the entire public school system.

Pro: Charter schools, unlike traditional public schools are held accountable. If charters do not perform, they are not renewed.
Con: Charters are not accountable as they are freed from rules and regulations intended to ensure quality in public education.

The pros and cons listed above should be studied and weighed very seriously. What works in one community may not work in another. What I have founded more fascinating than debating the pros and cons of charter schools is what is often overlooked; the role state legislators play with the expansion of charter schools. The majority of charter school arguments take place in legislative sessions (not at family dinner tables) since the programs that enable choice in public education are legislative enactments. Who you vote for (or don’t) determines what educational programs are received in your community. Too often, the communities that need the most educational options have residents who are least likely to vote.

One can have the best ideas and plans on how to educate your communities but how public dollars are allocated is determined by an elected official not the school and the families that make up that school. In order to help change the crisis in education, families must become more informed of educational choices and involved in school district issues. Parents must also be engaged politically by voting for individuals that have their family’s best interest at stake.

A child’s education, whether charter or public, is dependent on the family foundation, the skills of the teachers he or she encounters daily, the leadership of the principals, the effectiveness of the school district, community engagement and who write the laws in state legislatures. In order to have more positive outcomes surrounding the education of children, parents must do their homework on issues and make sure they are investing in their child’s future by voting in every election.

In 2012, the survival of public education will be determined by who is elected to the highest office in the land. But locals must give as much priority to state and county elections. They are equally important especially when it comes to education.

*Data compiled from NCSL Issues and Research.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

HERstory: Dr. Betty Moseley Brown on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

In 1999, Congress designated the month of May as Military Appreciation Month to recognize and reflect on the men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces and their families who serve and have served this great country of ours. This month is to celebrate and honor the contributions of those who are a part of and have been a part of the US Armed Forces and the contributions they have made in preserving our way of life. Many organizations and communities around the country are celebrating this month in various ways to recognize our Active Duty members and their families, our Reserve Component members and their families and our Veterans and their families.

Join Living Your Best Life as we celebrate "HERstroy...Women In the Military" for the next few weeks. We will hear from military women, active and veterans, who are daughters, wives, mothers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts, and friends. Women from the Marines, Army, Air Force, and Navy will share personal stories and highlights from their military careers. All have roles that made them the "first" in many endeavors throughout their lives and in the military. We will hear about their many acts of courage and sacrifice that embody servant leadership that will empower, inspire, and motivate listeners.

On Saturday, May 26, 2012, we will hear from leaders in the Veterans Administration. Dr. Betty Moseley Brown, Associate Director of the Center for Women Veterans, and Colonel Many-Bears Grinder, the first female to lead Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs, will share how their decision to serve our country helped shaped their passion to serve others.

In 2010, the theme for Women's History month was "Writing Women Back into History." Dr. Moseley Brown, a Marine, challenged the theme's concept by asking, "When were women written out of history?" That question lead her to initiating HERstory to recognize the contributions of women veterans. Starting internally within the VA, she advocated for women who have severed our country faithfully and courageously stories be told. In 2011, HERstory went beyond the VA to other branches of the military. Dr. Moseley Brown efforts are now being duplicated by many around the country who want to share the countless stories of women who have served in the Armed Forces.


(Dr.Betty Moseley Brown and Colonel Many-Bears Grinder at Women Veteran's Summit)

Colonel Many-Bears Grinder will share her life's journey and how 35 years of service in the military gives her wisdom and compassion on how to serve our men and women after their military duties have ended. Her story includes her life as a wife, mother, daughter, sister, and mother-in-law of a fallen solider. She bares her heart and soul in an interview that will leave you wanting to hear more from one of Tennessee's inspiring servant leaders.


This series of shows will have a "few surprises" as well. Tune into 760AM in the Middle Tennessee Region, streaming live online at UStream.TV and on military bases on Saturdays from 9:00-10am CST.

More About Dr. Betty Moseley Brown


Betty Moseley Brown assumed the position of Associate Director of the Center for Women Veterans on November 1, 2004. Dr. Moseley Brown’s passion for Veterans began during her United States Marine Corps service from 1978 – 1992. During her military years she was a Chaplains Assistant in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, a recruiter in Baltimore, Maryland, and a Personnel Chief in San Diego, California. Her Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) career began at the San Diego Regional Office, where she was a Veterans Benefits Counselor and served as the Women Veterans Coordinator. She briefly left the VA to work for the Department of the Navy.

Dr. Moseley Brown’s Mother was an Army Veteran and her Father retired from the Air Force. Both are in eternal resting places at a VA National Cemetery. In March 2010, Dr. Moseley Brown kicked-off the “Her Story” campaign to recognize the military contributions of women Veterans.

Photo credits: TN Women's Veteran Summit in Nashville: TN Dept of VA

Dr. Betty Moseley Brown with family: Dr.Betty Brown Moseley

More about Colonel Many-Bears Grinder here.

More about Colonel Jacqueline Nave here.

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Creativity Moves Kicks Off Inaugural Event to Celebrate Creativity and Giving Back

On May 24-27, Nashville will come together to celebrate creativity and a spirit of giving back to the community. Creativity Moves Nashville is a four-day event mobilizing the city’s creativity to benefit Nashville. Advanced registration and tickets are available at www.creativitymoves.com.

The event will feature a half-day professional development conference for creative leaders, entrepreneurs, and non-profit organizations, as well as public creative workshops, live performances, and a free program for young adult cancer survivors on the power of sharing one’s story.


Dr. Jacob Weiss
, Creativity Moves Nashville founder, recognized a need to facilitate partnerships between local creative leaders and non-profit organizations during his experiences in community-building projects across the fields of arts, entertainment, non-profits, and health care.

“There are so many amazing people and initiatives in Nashville,” explains Weiss. “And as more people discover the impact of supporting causes through creative approaches, they will be inspired to get involved in these programs and to start their own projects and partnerships.”

Creative individuals are looking for ways to give back while developing their hobbies and careers, and local non-profits are seeking creative strategies to build awareness and fundraising for their programs.

From musical reviews that educate about cancer prevention to photographers capturing portraits for people in need, Nashville residents are finding meaning by applying their creativity to benefit the community.

Creativity Moves Nashville will take place at Belmont University’s Black Box Theater, hosted by Nashville’s Sideshow Fringe Festival, with additional locations for the creative workshops. All elements of the program include components of both creativity and giving back.


Artists, entrepreneurs, and other creative leaders will learn career-building strategies by developing mutually beneficial relationships with non-profit organizations and causes. In turn, representatives from non-profits will explore new approaches to connect with the creative community to achieve success in their fundraising and programming goals. Together, attendees will build a vision for the future of creativity and causes in Nashville through a hands-on workshop powered by LEGO Serious Play.

Individuals and families are invited to nurture their creativity by attending public performances featuring music, juggling, and comedy from Playing By Air and participating in workshops hosted by The Skillery. Sunday’s free program for young adult cancer survivors and supporters will feature live entertainment, inspiring cancer survivor speakers, and an interactive songwriting program led by Grammy and Emmy nominated, CMA & ACM award winning songwriter Billy Kirsch.

Speakers include Sam Davidson (co-founder of Cool People Care), Lu Sipos (founder of Gabe's Chemo Duck Program), Joy Huber (author of Cancer with Joy), and entrepreneur, Genma Holmes, along with other inspiring community leaders and cancer survivors.

Details, schedules, speakers, and ticketing information for the event on May 24-27 are available online at www.creativitymoves.com. Seating is limited, and attendees are encouraged to register early to guarantee a seat.

About Creativity Moves Nashville
Creativity Moves Nashville is an initiative of Nashville-based companies Playing By Air Productions, and High-Wired Communities, in partnership with Nashville's community leaders. The 2012 program is made possible by support of community partners including the Sideshow Fringe Festival, The Skillery, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Healthways, The Village Fund, Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission, Arts & Business Council of Greater Nashville, Nossi College of Art, Tennessee Association of Craft Artists, NowPlayingNashville.com, Kid Billy Music, Jody Lentz, Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes, and Brick Factory Nashville.

Previous Stories about Dr. Jacob Weiss can be found here and here

Sunday, May 20, 2012

HERstory: Colonel Many-Bears Grinder on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

In 1999, Congress designated the month of May as Military Appreciation Month to recognize and reflect on the men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces and their families who serve and have served this great country of ours. This month is to celebrate and honor the contributions of those who are a part of and have been a part of the US Armed Forces and the contributions they have made in preserving our way of life. Many organizations and communities around the country are celebrating this month in various ways to recognize our Active Duty members and their families, our Reserve Component members and their families and our Veterans and their families.

Join Living Your Best Life as we celebrate "HERstroy...Women In the Military" for the next few weeks. We will hear from military women, active and veterans, who are daughters, wives, mothers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts, and friends. Women from the Marines, Army, Air Force, and Navy will share personal stories and highlights from their military careers. All have roles that made them the "first" in many endeavors throughout their lives and in the military. We will hear about their many acts of courage and sacrifice that embody servant leadership that will empower, inspire, and motivate listeners.



On Saturday, May 26,2012, we will hear from Colonel Many-Bears Grinder, the first female to become Commissioner of Tennessee Department of Veteran Affairs. Colonel Grinder will share stories from her military career. We will hear her humble spirit as she shares about serving the troops even before she enlisted. Colonel Grinder will share how being a female made her determined to be successful and why she purposely selected non-traditional women roles throughout her military career.




As Memorial Day approaches, Colonel Grinder will share intimately why we should never forget the many sacrifices that are made daily for our country by our men and women in the military.

This three part series will have a "few surprises" as well. Tune into 760AM in the Middle Tennessee Region, streaming live online at UStream.TV and on military bases on Saturdays from 9:00-10am CST.

More About Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder TN Depart of Veterans Affairs

In January 2011, Governor Bill Haslam selected Many-Bears Grinder to be the Commissioner for the Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs, the first female in the State to serve in this capacity. She is responsible for the operation of the Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs’ Field Offices, Claims Office, and four State Veterans Cemeteries. She is also an ex-officio voting member of the Tennessee State Veterans Home Board, which controls the three existing State Veterans Homes, and plans for future homes in Tennessee. Commissioner Grinder serves as the Southeast District Vice President for the National Association of State Directors of Veterans Affairs.

In order to accept the State post, Grinder retired from the Tennessee Army National Guard as a Colonel with over 35 years of service. She is an Operation Enduring Freedom combat veteran, having served as the Head of Secretariat for the International Police Coordination Board. She traveled throughout Afghanistan, working with international diplomats and police as well as the Afghan leaders and local police officers, to ensure standardized training and equipment for the Afghan Police.

Grinder was inducted into the Fort Benning Hall of Fame in 2004. She is a graduate of the Command and General Staff College, the U.S. Army War College, and the Joint Forces Staff College. Her military awards include the Legion of Merit and the Bronze Star Medal.

Grinder holds a Master’s Degree in Strategic Studies from the Army War College and a Master’s Degree in Human Resources Development from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Commissioner Grinder is a member of numerous military and Veterans associations, including AMVETS, Vietnam Veterans of America, Women Veterans of America, Military Officers Association, the National Guard Association of the United States and is also a life member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion and the Disabled American Veterans.

A native of Salt Lake City, Utah, Grinder moved to Tennessee in 1989 where she met and married Ernie Grinder.


Previous HERstory: Colonel Jacqueline Nave found here.

Photo credits: Photos from Memorial Day 2011, Tennessee Dept of Veteran Affairs

Saturday, May 19, 2012

HERstory: Colonel Jacqueline Nave on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

Audio of Colonel Jacqueline Nave's Interview here.

In 1999, Congress designated the month of May as Military Appreciation Month to recognize and reflect on the men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces and their families who serve and have served this great country of ours. This month is to celebrate and honor the contributions of those who are a part of and have been a part of the US Armed Forces and the contributions they have made in preserving our way of life. Many organizations and communities around the country are celebrating this month in various ways to recognize our Active Duty members and their families, our Reserve Component members and their families and our Veterans and their families.

Join Living Your Best Life as we celebrate "HERstroy...Women In the Military" for the next few weeks. We will hear from military women, active and veterans, who are daughters, wives, mothers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts, and friends. Women from the Marines, Army, Air Force, and Navy will share personal stories and highlights from their military careers. All have roles that made them the "first" in many endeavors throughout their lives and in the military. We will hear about their many acts of courage and sacrifice that embody servant leadership that will empower, inspire, and motivate listeners.

We will hear from the Dr. Betty Mosley Brown, USMC, who was essential to helping implement "HERstroy" for the Center for Women Veterans in DC. We hear from the first female African American Marine combat pilot, Bernice Armour. Also joining the lineup will be the first female Commissioner of Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs, Many-Bears Grinder. Lt. Colonel (Dr.) Daphne Young will share about joining the Army in her forties, and we will celebrate Colonel Jacqueline A. Nave's last flight as she retires after 30 years in the military. Join us for the on air "retirement party" on May, 19, 2012.

This three part series will have a "few surprises" as well. Tune into 760AM in the Middle Tennessee Region, streaming live on line at UStream.TV and on military bases on Saturdays from 9:00-10am CST.






More About Colonel Jacqueline A. Nave




Colonel Jacqueline Nave is the Commander of the 118th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron (AES) at the 118th Airlift Wing, Tennessee Air National Guard. Colonel Nave entered the Tennessee Air National Guard in 1986 with a direct commission as a Flight Nurse.

She served as a Flight Nurse Instructor and Flight Nurse Examiner while assigned to the 118th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron. Her assignments included deployments to Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and United Arab Emirates.

In 1999, Colonel Nave transferred to the 118th Medical Group as the Administrative Officer. She was commissioned as a line officer in 2000 assigned as a full time technician to Joint Forces Headquarters. Colonel Nave was selected as Deputy
Commander of the 118th Medical Group in 2002.

As one of the first three full time Deputy Commanders in the Air National Guard, Colonel Nave was instrumental in the development and implementation of the manpower study and job descriptions for this position. Col Nave served as the Commander of the 118th AES from March until December 2007 when she was appointed as the Command Nurse of the Air National Guard and Chief of AE Plans and Operations by the National Guard Bureau. She maintained oversight for 89 Medical Groups and 10 Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons during her two year tour in Washington, DC. Col Nave coordinated patient movement during the most active hurricane season in history, safely moving more than 500 patients from Texas and Louisiana. She was responsible for planning the Air National Guard Homeland Security medical response for the 2009 Presidential Inauguration.

Colonel Nave returned as the Commander for the 118th AES in November, 2009 and continued until her retirement April 7, 2012. Under her leadership, the Squadron earned and “Outstanding” on the 2012 Health Service Inspection and “Mission Ready” on the 2012 ASEV.

EDUCATION:

1973 AAD in Nursing, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN
1986 School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks AFB, San Antonio, TX
1996 Baccalaureate Degree, Nursing Science, Graceland College Lamoni, IA
1998 Masters in Health Care Administration, Graceland College, Lamoni, IA
2001 Health Services Administration School, Sheppard AFB, Wichita Falls, TX
2002 Air Force Personnel School, Keesler AFB, MS
2007 Air War College


ASSIGNMENTS:
1. 1986-2000, 118 AES, Flight Instructor/Flight Examiner, Nashville, TN
2. 2000-2007, 118 MDG, Deputy Commander, Nashville, TN
3. 2007-2009, Chief Nurse of the Air National Guard, Chief AE Plans and Operations, Andrews Air Force Base, MD
3. 2009-2012, 118 AES, Commander, Nashville, TN

MAJOR AWARDS AND DECORATIONS:
Legion of Merit
Meritorious Service Medal with 1 device
Air Force Commendation Medal with 1 device
Army Commendation Medal
Air Force Achievement Medal with 1 device
AF Outstanding Unit Award
Combat Readiness Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Southwest Asia Service Medal with 3 devices
Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
AF Longevity Service with 3 devices
Armed Forces Reserve Medal with 2 “M” devices
Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon with 1 device
AF Training Ribbon
Kuwait Liberation Medal Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Kuwait Liberation Medal Government of Kuwait
Tennessee National Guard Individual Achievement Ribbon
Tennessee National Guard Recruiting Merit Ribbon
Tennessee National Guard War Service Ribbon
Tennessee National Guard Volunteer Ribbon
Tennessee National Guard Distinguished Unit Commendation
Tennessee National Guard Outstanding Unit Performance Commendation

EFFECTIVE DATES OF PROMOTIONS:

Second Lieutenant 18 May 1986
First Lieutenant 01 July 1988
Captain 15 July 1990
Major 01 October 1998
Lieutenant Colonel 05 April 2003
Colonel 29 April 2008


Photo Credits:
Dr. Betty Moseley Brown (VA)
Captain Vernice Armour (Marine Corp)
Colonel(Rt)Commissioner Many-Bears Grinder (State of TN)
Colonel Jacqueline Nave (118th Air Guard)
Lt.Colonel Dr. Daphne Young (Meharry Medical College)
Last Flight photos of Colonel Nave (118th Air Guard)

Saturday, May 12, 2012

Tennessee Respite Coalition on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

This Mother's Day weekend, Living Your Best Life will focus on the role of Caregivers and the importance if taking care of people who take care of their loved ones.

As of 2003, nearly 36 million people in the United States were 65 years of age or older - 12% of the population. By 2030, this group will DOUBLE in number to 72 million and will constitute 1/5 of all people in the US. In the US, more than 50 million people, provide care for a chronically ill, disabled or aged family member or friend during any given year. The average caregiver is female, 56 years old, married, employed outside the home, and frequently provides care for elders and children simultaneously.


Join us on Saturday, May 12, 2012, to hear Jennifer Abernathy, executive director of Tennessee Respite Coalition discuss her how agency's mission is enhancing the quality of life for family caregivers through respite. Family caregivers in Tennessee provided 634 million hours of care last year. But often very few hours are provided for the care of the caretaker.

Living Your Best Life, is a radio show that empowers inspires, and motivates one to live their BEST life. Living Your Best Life can be heard on 760 The Gospel in the Middle TN Region, Inspirational Networks, military bases, and UStream.TV from 9-10AM CST.

More About Tennessee Respite Coalition






The Tennessee Respite Coalition (TRC) works with family caregivers across the state of Tennessee to help provide them with short-term, temporary relief from their duties caring for adults or children with disabilities or special needs. Temporary relief can enable caregivers to satisfy their own needs and get a much-needed break from the demands of providing ongoing care.

TRC assists caregivers who look after individuals of any age, and allows them to choose their own respite provider. While their loved ones are cared for, caregivers may engage in a variety of activities, from taking a trip to spending time with other family members and catching up on other errands such as grocery shopping. In the past year, TRC has provided more than 200 families across the state of Tennessee with access to respite services. For more info about TRC click here.

More About The Art of Time Fundraiser


The Art of Time is an evening filled with cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, entertainment and exciting live and silent auction items featuring local artists and some other fun items! Proceeds from the event assist the TRC in supporting the many programs serving family caregivers in Tennessee.

The Art of Time will take place Friday, May 18th, beginning at 6:00 p.m. in Whiskey Bent Saloon’s Frontier Room. The Frontier Room is Nashville’s best private event space on Broadway. It will be a wonderful space to view the art up for auction. Directions to www.Whiskeybentsaloon.com

Entrance to the event will be off Third Avenue just off of Broadway (look for the banner). We will have a private entrance to the Frontier Room off the upper patio behind the Batman Building.

Saturday, May 5, 2012

Creativity Moves on Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes

Join Living Your Best Life with Genma Holmes and Mocha Market Magazine as we spotlight young, talented, and out of the box thinkers who are business and social change agents. From serial entrepreneurs who will not allow the word “no” be a stumbling block on the road to success to leaders of organizations who challenge the status quo by leading by example to military men and women who are taking their military training that helped rebuild foreign countries and now applying their skills in their communities and in the marketplace. Tune in to hear best practices, how they became overcomers, and how they turned missteps into opportunities.

On Saturday May 5, 2012, Dr. Jacob Weiss of Playing by Air will share his latest project, Creativity Moves.

Creativity Moves is a 4-day event coming to Nashville on May 24-27, 2012 that will mobilize the city's creativity to benefit the Nashville community. The programs will bring together a wide range of the local community, including creative professionals, artists, entrepreneurs, non-profit leaders, meeting planners, educators, cancer survivors, families, and the public.

The entire community is invited to come together to celebrate a shared passion for creativity and giving back.

Along with Dr.Jacob Weiss, we will hear from Joy Huber, cancer survivor and author of Cancer with Joy, and Lu Sipos, founder of Gabe is my Heart. Hear both women share how cancer impacted their life and how they use their stories to empower, inspire, and motivate others to serve.

Living Your Best Life, is a radio show that empowers inspires, and motivates one to live their BEST life. Living Your Best Life can be heard on 760 The Gospel in the Middle TN Region, Inspirational Networks, military bases, and UStream.TV from 9-10AM CST.

More about Creativity Moves


Nashville, TN — On May 24-27, Nashville will come together to celebrate creativity and a spirit of giving back to the community. Creativity Moves Nashville is a four-day event mobilizing the city’s creativity to benefit Nashville, with programs for artists, creative professionals, entrepreneurs, non-profits, health care, and the public.

Nashville is home to a thriving community of creative talent, from musicians to startups, including a mix of amateurs and professionals. The same passion that drives these individuals’ creative growth also fosters a desire to give back to meaningful causes and non-profit organizations.

Innovative partnerships between creative and non-profit communities provide opportunities for individuals to develop successful careers that also benefit a greater cause.

From musical reviews that educate about cancer prevention to photographers capturing portraits for people in need, Nashville residents are finding meaning by applying their creativity to benefit the community.

Creative individuals are looking for ways to give back while developing their hobbies and careers, and local non-profits are seeking creative strategies to build awareness and fundraising for their programs.
Creativity Moves: Connecting Creativity and Causes

Creativity Moves Nashville nurtures connections and partnerships between creativity and causes, generating awareness for local community-building programs and resources.

The event will feature a half-day professional development conference for creative leaders and non-profit organizations, city-wide creative workshops, live performances, and a free program for young adult cancer survivors on the power of sharing one’s story.

The event will take place at Belmont University’s Black Box Theatre, hosted by Nashville’s Sideshow Fringe Festival, with additional locations for the creative workshops. All elements of the program include components of both creativity and giving back.

Artists, entrepreneurs, and other creative leaders will learn career-building strategies by developing mutually beneficial relationships with non-profit organizations and causes. In turn, representatives from non-profits will explore new approaches to connect with the creative community to achieve success in their fundraising and programming goals.

For more info about Creativity Moves click here.

More About Joy Huber



Joy Huber is a stage four young adult cancer survivor and the founder & author of "Cancer with Joy" published by Morgan James Publishing of NYC. She is an award-winning international presenter, individual coach, and the co-writer of the song "Bright Side Effects" (see the Music Video and additional videos on YouTube).

Joy helps the newly diagnosed and those on their support team discover how to transform fear into happiness with resources, support, and en'courage'ment. She wrote "Cancer with Joy" to be the essential resource for the newly diagnosed providing helpful and highly valuable information that saves precious time, energy, and money. Joy was professionally trained in coaching by Coach U, and she offers individual coaching on a limited basis.

At Creativity Moves Nashville, Joy will share her story of how she went from stage four cancer diagnosis to book deal in less than a year! Joy is professionally trained to coach others with a story to tell and presents an entrepreneurship program for young adults.

More About Chemo Duck



Gabe’s Chemo Duck Program® is a program of the Nashville-based nonprofit organization, Gabe’s My Heart. Established in 2004 to provide education and comfort to children living with cancer through medical play using therapeutic tools, Gabe’s Chemo Duck Program has provided more than 5,000 ducks to children around the world. Our goal is to enable hospital staff, parents and caregivers to prepare children for chemotherapy treatment and eliminate the fear of the unknown. We work directly with child life departments at our affiliate hospitals to ensure children and their families obtain the full benefit of our program. Chemo Duck is a stuffed yellow duck dressed in blue hospital scrubs with a bandana around its head, a chemotherapy port on its chest and an immobilizer on his arm. In a gentle, age-appropriate manner, children learn what to expect during cancer treatment and have a friend to share the experience. In turn, children can use Chemo Duck to help friends, siblings and classmates to understand and empathize with their experience. For information about Chemo Duck click here.